Charitable status is colonial: This organization is encouraging Canadians to give to Indigenous-led organizations without expecting a tax receipt

Why It Matters

Canada’s very first National Day of Truth and Reconciliation was held on Sept. 30 this year. The statutory holiday is not only a reminder of Canada’s past and ongoing atrocities against First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities, but also one to act against the same. This raises the question: “How can settlers participate in meaningful philanthropy that advances reconciliation?”

Wellness is still a taboo topic in the social impact world. This founder wants to change that for good.

Why It Matters

Canadians, on the whole, are unwell. Our burnout, fatigue and stress levels are higher than the global averages. Meanwhile, many of the tools available to boost our wellbeing — exercise, mindfulness — are increasingly expensive and inaccessible, especially to groups who have been historically oppressed and marginalized.

Settlers, here are the questions leaders in reconciliation and decolonization want you to spend National Day for Truth and Reconciliation asking yourself

Why It Matters

A majority of social purpose organizations are settler-led but work with and serve Indigenous people and communities every day. It’s imperative that these organizations meaningfully engage in decolonizing and embedding reconciliation principles into their work, to work with Indigenous communities in more informed and respectful ways.

At the rate it’s going, Canada won’t complete the TRC Calls to Action until 2074. Here’s what would change with Indigenous youth policy leaders in charge.

Why It Matters

In 2020, Canada only completed eight of the 94 Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action — one less than 2019. Indigenous knowledge and ways of being inherently respect other people and the planet — and if Indigenous youth policy leaders had an equal voice at decision-making tables, they could radically impact issues from the environment to racial equity, wealth distribution, and more.

Here are seven of the social impact sector’s most urgent requests during the federal election

Why It Matters

Non-profits, charities, and mutual aid organizations work on issues independently of the election cycle — and may have insight into some of Canada’s most pressing concerns that political parties do not.

Hate is the 2021 election’s elephant in the room. Here’s what social impact organizations want federal leaders to do about it.

Why It Matters

Hate is a life-or-death issue for many Canadians, be they Black, Indigenous, Muslim, Asian, Sikh, queer, trans, or a woman. All of the major political parties have made promises to end hate, but that won’t happen without sustained pressure from leaders themselves.