This grassroots group supports COVID-19 survivors around the world. Here’s what Canada’s social impact sector can learn.

Why It Matters

About 386,000 Canadians have recovered from COVID-19, and another 76,000 have active cases. With potential long-term physical, mental and even social impacts of having survived the virus, these hundreds of thousands, and many more, will likely need support for years into the future — and social impact organizations could support their recovery in a number of ways.

The pandemic revealed this massive blind spot in elder care

Why It Matters

Senior care in Canada is a complex and disconnected system. After the pandemic, experts believe the elder-care system needs to take a more holistic approach that connects the social service of long-term care more closely to the medical system. This story is produced in partnership with SE Health, a social enterprise dedicated to impacting how people live and age at home.

Canada’s first COVID-19 vaccine is on the way. How can the social impact world make sure it gets to those who need it most?

Why It Matters

Canada just approved a COVID-19 vaccine. Meanwhile, Toronto’s Black community is getting infected with COVID-19 at disproportionately high rates. Medical inequities and distrust are part of the problem and the incoming vaccine may not be enough.

How one Montreal organization pivoted during the pandemic to respond to seniors in crisis

Why It Matters

As the coronavirus pandemic exacerbates risks for the most vulnerable populations, seniors are experiencing poverty, food insecurity, and mental health crises while facing social isolation. A Montreal organization says that for some seniors in their community, it’s an issue of life and death. This is our second story in a series with Innoweave.

Is the Canadian education system properly equipping the next generation of social innovators?

Why It Matters

In the face of a global pandemic that has upended the education system and equal access to it, specialized tools and strategies are needed now more than ever to nurture a new generation of social innovators. This is our third story in partnership with the Rideau Hall Foundation in celebration of #CanadianInnovationWeek.

Mi’kmaq fishing rights, explained for the social impact sector

Why It Matters

Systemic racism, economic inclusion, and the practice of Indigenous reconciliation are all at play here. The social impact sector cannot solve the core issue of the Mi’kmaq people’s treaty rights — and ongoing violence against their community. However, the sector could play a role in economic and cultural recovery.