Four intrapreneurs share how they drive social change from inside organizations

Why It Matters

Lasting impact can happen when organizations empower and encourage young leaders to create bold change from within. They help build stronger communities, increase economic opportunity and growth, and improve the quality of life of Canadians. A deeper understanding of young intrapreneurs’ stories will help the social impact sector thrive.

When we all return to the office, will social impact organizations keep supporting parents and caregivers?

Why It Matters

Caregivers need concrete, clear policies that allow them to take time off work when needed. The social impact world is seen as very accommodating, but doesn’t always have formal HR policies or procedures to back up its good intentions.

There’s a mentorship gap in Canada. Here’s how — and why — to close it.

Why It Matters

Young people who are mentored are 53 percent more likely to report good mental health, and more than twice as likely to report a strong sense of belonging in their community. At a time when youths’ mental wellbeing and career prospects are limited by the pandemic, an equitable recovery requires a stronger culture of mentorship across the country.

The illusion of choice: Why I might have to give up my social work career to take care of my child

Why It Matters

The social impact sector is largely made up of women workers — women make up 80 percent of the non-profit workforce alone. Many of these women, like the author of this essay, take on a disproportionate share of caregiving for family members. To be more resilient, the sector will need to better support and accommodate caregivers, and that starts with understanding their experiences.