Indigenous youth weren’t involved in creating COVID-19 policies — here’s why that needs to change for recovery

Why It Matters

When creating COVID-19 protocols, the government didn’t always engage Indigenous communities, leaving many Indigenous leaders out of the decision-making process. Moving forward, that has to change; Indigenous youth are Canada's fastest-growing demographic, and for full COVID-19 recovery — one that takes into account the wellbeing of Indigenous communities — young policy leaders need equal say in building a better future.

This founder’s new program is reactivating Indigenous concepts of investing — here’s how

Why It Matters

“A key strategy in the colonization process, the residential school system, and the Indian Act, was to remove Indigenous Peoples from the land and displace Indigenous economies for the benefit of the settler population,” reads the Sage Initiative website. “This initiative is designed to reverse that process.”

Indigenous youth should lead Canada’s implementation of UNDRIP, experts say

Why It Matters

After its initial refusal in 2007, Canada endorsed the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People: a piece of legislation impacting everything from resource extraction to land disputes. With Indigenous youth being the future of their communities, it’s vital that UNDRIP be implemented with Indigenous youth policy leaders at the forefront, shaping what future legislation looks like in Canada.

This social enterprise is building Indigenous ethical systems into digital tools — here’s what you can learn

Why It Matters

Building Indigenous value systems into the bedrock of an app allows an Indigenous developer or online community to practice digital sovereignty — meaningful control over their digital space that allows them to safely share their culture, language, and practices.

The social innovation ecosystem still doesn’t understand Indigenous innovation. This project is working to close the gap.

Why It Matters

The rate of new businesses in Indigenous communities is growing at five times the rate of non-Indigenous entrepreneurship. The size of the Indigenous business economy is expected to grow from $30 billion to $100 billion by 2025. If impact investors want in, they need a much deeper understanding of what makes up Indigenous innovation.