Full video: Canadian Red Cross CEO Conrad Sauvé on how to prepare for the next global emergency

Why It Matters

Major crises like climate disasters and pandemics are, and will continue to, increase in frequency. The good news, though, is that organizations responding to these crises and their aftershocks can use learnings from this pandemic to prepare for the next emergency.

The voices of Afghan women and girls are being muted — it’s time for Canadian women to fill the silence

Why It Matters

Canadian, international and Afghan women’s rights organizations have spent the last few decades fighting tirelessly for women’s education, work, and safety. Their work — and their partnerships with one another — are significantly threatened under the Taliban.

Full video: What will it take to decolonize global development? Devex founder Raj Kumar weighs in

Why It Matters

Global inequality is at a high, and so, therefore, is the relevance of humanitarian aid and global development work. But many argue this work has a colonial power imbalance that perpetuates the very inequity it aims to dissolve.

Canadian charities say building partnerships with local organizations is tough. This new Senate bill may change that

Why It Matters

If passed, Bill S-222 could undo a decades-old rule that Canadian charities say prevents them from building fair, equal partnerships with grassroots organizations, rather than hierarchical and colonial relationships.

Community and connection are the core of resettling refugees. How have settlement organizations navigated lockdown?

Why It Matters

Newcomers are having a hard time finding community in Canada, because of COVID-19 shutdowns and the xenophobia it’s brought. If they can’t fully participate in life here in Canada, not only does it negatively impact their wellbeing, but all Canadians miss out on the ways newcomers make our communities better.

When the "other" becomes a mirror: Reflecting on why sensitivity training assumes international development workers are white

Why It Matters

Humanitarian aid and international development organizations are beginning to have important conversations about race, class, and other markers of privilege. But while international development used to be a predominantly white field, the tides are changing, and the historic realities of white development workers are no longer the norm. Racialized development workers deserve support and training that understand their experiences.