Full video: An in-depth conversation about the future of Canada’s social safety nets

Sarah Schulman and Gord Tulloch are co-authors of a new book called The Trampoline Effect: Reimagining Our Social Safety Nets

Why It Matters

The pandemic is an opportunity to radically reimagine the ways Canadian government and civil society cares for people, say Sarah Schulman and Gord Tulloch — but to do so, both sectors need a deeper understanding of the problems embedded into our social safety nets.

Last week saw much buzz around the federal government’s big commitments to social safety net programs like child care — and even hundreds of millions for the “safety net to our safety net,” the charitable and non-profit sector. 

But, depending on who you ask, it did not radically reimagine what it means to support vulnerable communities or help them flourish. And if there were a time to do so, it’s post-global pandemic. 

Sarah Schulman and Gord Tulloch are the authors of a new book called The Trampoline Effect: Reimagining Our Social Safety Nets. The book envisions a future where social safety nets don’t catch and trap the people who access them, but rather trampoline them back up when they’re ready. 

How might this future come true? Future of Good publisher and CEO Vinod Rajase

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