“Totally unethical” charity wage disparities compound effects of inflation, pandemic

Non-profits need staff to deliver programs, but without adequate funding they struggle to recruit and retain employees. Future funding models must take the full cost of doing business into account — and that means fairly compensating frontline workers.

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More Canadians now rely on food banks than at any other time in Canadian history. Are we at a breaking point?

Twenty-two per cent of Canadians plan to access charitable services over the next six months — up from 14 per cent last January — just to meet basic needs, including food. Only systemic change can shift the burden — but will change come before the breaking point?

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“Virtually no part” of non-profit funding is indexed to inflation — what does that mean for non-profits and their communities?

Higher costs means funding promised to social purpose organizations doesn’t go as far as it once did. Indexing grants to inflation is one way of helping charities and other non-profits protect programming, retain staff and continue to serve the community.

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One in three Canadians age 18 to 24 will turn to charity to meet basic needs in coming months

Canadian charities face increased demand for service across the country, even as charitable giving declines in the face of inflationary pressures. Innovative and flexible ways of contributing time and money could help close the gap between need and capacity, allowing community serving organizations to continue to provide support to those turning to charities to make ends meet.

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Inflation has pushed some non-profits to their “lowest point” ever; can they survive?

As the cost of living climbs, more and more Canadians are turning to non-profits and charities for shelter, support, food and transportation. Without stable funding, these community services organizations may not be able to deliver.

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